AAPP Books

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“Prison Conditions in Burma and The Potential for Prison Reform” Report

Posted: Monday, September 26th, 2016

Download for “Prison Conditions in Burma and The Potential for Prison Reform” Report   ... Read more ➤

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“After release I had to restart my life from the beginning” The Experiences of Ex-political Prisoners in Burma and Challenges to Reintegration

Posted: Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Preface Since the military coup d’état in 1962, Burma has been in the grip of authoritarian rule. The junta has consistently practiced oppression, torture, arbitrary detention, and long-term imprisonment against perceived enemies of the regime. As a result, since 1962, thousands of political prisoners have been incarcerated by successive regimes, from the General Ne Win era (1962-1988), through to SLORC (1990- 1997), SPDC (1997-2011) and even the notionally civilian government led by former president U Thein Sein (2011-2016). AAPP resea... Read more ➤

cries form insein Cover

Cries form insein

Posted: Friday, May 8th, 2015

Cries From Insein by Win Naing Oo Thse articles were published in 1996 by the ABSDF (All Burma Students’ Democratic Front). 1. Read > 1.1 Structure of the Prison 2. Read > 2.1 Prison Instruction Cell 3. Read > Corruption in the Prison 4. Read > Punishment in Prison 5. Read > Legal Procedures in Prison 6. Read > Criminal Prisoners 7. Read > Politicall Prisoners 8. Read > Harrassment of Politicall Prisoner 9. Read > General Issues 10. Read > Conclusion 1.1 Structure of the Prison By Win Naing Oo The prison is l... Read more ➤

Tortured voices

Tortured voices

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

To survive, one needs mental power. It can bring not only physical changes but also great achievements. We can say that it controls a Man’s vice and virtue. Without mental power, the ability to survive under harsh conditions can be seriously affected. However, with mental power, Man can overcome all kinds of difficulties. This mental power can have an effect many times stronger than even nuclear power. Thousands of political prisoners have been in prisons in Burma – which has gone from being a developing country to one of the least ... Read more ➤

pleading not guilty

Pleading not guilty in Insein

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

This report is about human courage and dignity. In face of the most stringent deprivation and under the harshest duress, man can stand up and show that there is still one freedom that can’t be taken away: the freedom to choose how to respond to the situation. The political prisoners of Insein could have chosen to bow to the use of force. Their spirit could have been broken by torture and solitary confinement. But instead, they have chosen to respond with calmness and nobility. Not only have they pleaded not guilty to the trumped up charge... Read more ➤

The darkness we see

The darkness we see

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

There is an increased focus on the conditions for prisoners and others who are kept in detention in the world today and there are good reasons for that. The number of prisoners worldwide is increasing. The bad news is that the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims again and again receives alarming reports describing torture in interrogation centres, places of detention and prisons. The good news is that today we do have the international instruments that are needed to improve the conditions for detainees. There is a total pro... Read more ➤

The future in the dark

The future in the dark

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) (AAPP) and the U.S. Campaign for Burma (USCB), believe that an immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners, including Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and U Tin Oo, is an important and essential indicator to measure the positive development of the national reconciliation and democratization process in Burma (also known as Myanmar). Therefore, the people of Burma, the international community – especially the main bodies of the United Nations – and t... Read more ➤

Ten years on

10 years on

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Moe Aye was born in Mandalay in 1964 and was a student at the Rangoon Institute of Technology throughout the 1988 pro-democracy uprising. During the uprising he joined the All Burma Federation of Student Union (ABFSU). He later joined the youth wing of the National League for Democracy (NLD), becoming in-charge of information in Botahtaung Township. On the morning of August 9, 1988, the army shot at him while he was demonstrating nears the Shwe Dagon Pagoda in Rangoon. He was arrested by Military Intelligence on November 7, 1990. Moe Aye was ch... Read more ➤

spirit for survival

Spirit for Survival

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

To survive, one needs mental power. It can bring not only physical changes but also great achievements. We can say that it controls a Man’s vice and virtue. Without mental power, the ability to survive under harsh conditions can be seriously affected. However, with mental power, Man can overcome all kinds of difficulties. This mental power can have an effect many times stronger than even nuclear power. Thousands of political prisoners have been in prisons in Burma – which has gone from being a developing country to one of the least ... Read more ➤

women political prisoners

Women political prisoners in Burma

Posted: Sunday, March 30th, 2014

For the women who continue to struggle against the dictatorship Women Political Prisoners in Burma is a joint report of the Burmese Women’s Union (BWU) and the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma). In the history of Burmese politics – during the colonial and post-independence eras, under Ne Win’s Burmese Socialist Program Party, and now under the current military regime – there has been no political movement in which women were not involved. Although Burmese society holds that politics is the realm of men, many women b... Read more ➤